Tuesday, July 14, 2015

Happy Bastille Day



Dialogues des Carmelites

6 comments:

Francis Phillips said...

What comment can one make after watching this? Silent awe is the only response possible.

Long-Skirts said...

REVOLUTION

The Revolution
For all men’s right
Guillotined the Carmelite

The Revolution
The Church did smite
Guillotined the Carmelite

The Revolution
The Catholic blight
Guillotined the Carmelite

The Revolution
The lady’s knight
Guillotined the Carmelite

The Revolution
Fraternal might
Guillotined the Carmelite

But true Catholic Priest
In black cassock stuns --
Will guillotine…
revolutions!

Richard Duncan said...

The final scene from Poulenc’s opera Dialogues des Carmelites is also a powerful depiction of the martyrdom of the nuns of Compiegne. The moment when the axe first falls always sends a shiver up my spine.

Pelerin said...

I agree with Francis Phillips - this excerpt is almost too painful to watch. The bodies of the nuns of Compiegne were thrown into a pit and now lie there in the Picpus cemetery in Paris. I have visited it a few times and have always found myself alone there - a deeply moving experience.

A couple of reports (from the French Tradi news)have stated that this year the Cardinal Archbishop of Paris declined his place on the podium of dignitaries for the 14th July celebrations in protest of the passing of the law to allow same sex so called marriages. Apparently his place was taken by the Bishop for the Armed Forces. However having only just got round to watching one of the French news bulletins for that day his boycott was not mentioned and I have not found any other mention in the mainstream press either. I could not find any mention either on the website of 'La Croix' the so called mouthpiece of the French Bishops' Conference. Perhaps I have not been looking in the right places although it does look as if his boycott has been ignored - 'for political reasons' perhaps.

Francis Phillips said...

And I have just realised that Bastille Day (not so much a liberation of prisoners as heralding the Terror) is followed, two days later, by the Feast of Our Lady of Mount Carmel. Insane violence never has the last word.

Brother Ass said...

Although the works by LeFort and Poulenc are justly celebrated, they are mostly fictionalized accounts of the martyrdom. William Bush's book TO QUELL THE TERROR is a powerful recounting of events based on painstaking research. As it turns out, the real story is even more amazing and powerful than LeFort and others imagined.