Saturday, April 23, 2016

The Dragon is tamed not slain


Dragons exist, do not be deceived!

In the legend of St George the dragon is not slain but wounded and the fair maid once terrified of him ties a cord or a ribbon around his neck and leads him captive into the city.

This is a profound truth in the spiritual life, the dragon is still a dragon, the fair maid, the Christian soul, with the help of the victorious warrior, who is a type of Christ gives us power to subdue something which unchecked can be destructive.

We see this constantly in the conversion of the saints, they don't become different people but virtue takes on a courage and sin is tamed. Saint Peter is an obvious example, I doubt its historic truth but I love the quo vadis legend about Peter, Peter decides to leave Rome during the persecution, meets Christ on the Appian Way and immediately turns back to go to his death., it is so Peter, rash and impetuous always, until the end. It is same with St Francis or Ignatius of the Loyal or countless others, Christ tames the dragon, he is not slain.

8 comments:

Palincor IG said...

And I suppose the greatest voice of all that was St.Paul who never in the end won of himself against the evil he would not, and good that he wouldn't, but instead learn't that God's grace was sufficient and made sin as it were, a source of sanctification.

The Bones said...

Yes, brilliant post.

Thomas said...

Pure gold wisdom. Thank-you. I suppose what amounts to proximate occasion of sin will vary from person to person which only each of us will know in the secret of our hearts and may be things apparently harmless to others. But what has been impressed on me over the years is: 'Do not feed the dragon! Not even a morsel'.

Palincor IG said...

That last comment by Thomas is so spot on

Jeremiah Methuselah said...

Father Blake,

As you have brought up St George, on the good Saint’s day, may I mention an excellent story involving him from the most recent issue of “Crisis” magazine ? It tells us a lot about him, all of it legendary, but, well, it could well be true anyway.

http://www.crisismagazine.com/2016/heroism-in-the-land-of-dragons

Mary Kay said...

Why do you doubt the historicity? Perhaps I am too literal in my understanding...

Jeremiah Methuselah said...

@Mary Kay : I don't, not at all, but it seems to me that this is spoken tradition rather than written tradition, there is a difference.

I was one of those who protested when the compendium of saints (St George and St Philomena were casualties)was brought about, to no avail of course.

This site explains much better than I could : http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/06453a.htm

If St George is not the patron of England, I just wonder who is ?

Nicolas Bellord said...

Near us in Portugal we have the sanctuary of Our Lady of Lapa (rock) where there is venerated a statue of Our Lady buried at the time of the Muslim invasions by fleeing nuns and refound in 1498. One of the many miracles performed there concerned a woman saved from a dragon. Just to convince any doubters the villagers caught the dragon, stuffed it and hung it up in the Church for all to see to this day. You can see it on youtube if you search for Nossa Senhora da Lapa.