Monday, May 09, 2011

Pope didn't use glass

He did ride in a gondola, he did draw 300,000 to a mega Mass but on his weekend visit to Venice the Pope didn't use a glass chalice.
Venetian glass makers presented the Pope with a set of glass models of liturgical vessel, and there was speculation that these might be used in a liturgical celebration in contravention of Sacramentum Redemptionis which forbids vessel which are made of a fragile material.

13 comments:

Doodler said...

So what's the issue?

Jonathan said...

Thanks be to God. God bless Pope Benedict XVI.

Physiocrat said...

SMM has nicer chalices than that - it looks vulgarly over ornate and an ugly square shape.

Fr Levi said...

Even if these items were permitted by Church law, might not simple good taste have led the Pope to reject their use? It might be the photograph, but to my eyes they seem highly unattractive.

Anonymous said...

lThe very sacred vessles were not glass, but the cross and candlesticks were very fine crystal. I suspect the creus, ewer and basin were the ones shown. In spite of the law about the truly sacred containers, this episode shows that truly fine mateials of a less than conventional character can be quite lovely. Fr. Mike Forbes Rochester, Minnesota, USA

universal doctor said...

Laus Deo!
The glasswork is exquisite, but as we know forbidden in the celebration of the Holy Eucharist. I would have been mightily surprised had the Holy Father used them.

Baron Korf said...

Beautiful pieces. I think they do a good job honoring their sacred counterparts.

Saint Michael Come To Our Defense said...

Padre,

Speaking of gifts, would you please let me know if your gift from us gets there?

The rose bushes that Our Lady provided to Saint Juan Diego still grow upon Tepeyac Hill.

Included in the gift is a small amount of pedals from those roses bushes gathered on December 12th, 2010.

God be with you, Padre.

*

Fr Ray Blake said...

SMCTOD,
Not yet

Merton Smythe said...

As to glass chalices and patens: The Cloisters Museum in New York has a set of chalice and paten in glass from the 14th century on display in their treasury room. And the Archdiocese of Sens and the Diocese of Senlis in France have in their treasuries whole cabinets full of lead-crystal chalices and patens on display from the 17th to the 19th centuries. So they are by no means ‘novelties’ despite the present opinion of some.

rachel said...

the glass chalices and the rest of the Sacred vessels are awful!!! Thanks be to God for the traditional ones!!!!

Paul, Bedfordshire said...

I wonder where things stand if super toughened unbreakable glass is used.

I'll get my coat...

Maria said...

The vessel at the Last Supper would have been a simple piece of pottery.
However, metal does not break and it more hygienic. Glass easily shatters.

Tradition is based on practicality.

From www-
"Archaeologist Jerome Murphy O’Connor said that while wealthy Jews might have used more ornate tableware, perhaps made of glass or metal, Jesus and his followers had little money.

"In nine out of 10 cases, pottery would have been the favorite for poor people," said Murphy O’Connor, a scholar at Ecole Biblique".