Friday, March 15, 2013

Bartholomew is coming to the Inauguration



It has been announced that the Patriarch of Constantinople, Bartholomew II, will attend the Mass of the Inauguration of Pope Francis, the first time this has happened since the Great Schism.
This seems to be an act of appreciation of Benedict XVI's outreach to the Orthodox Church and also a reminder that Catholic/Orthodox dialogue should be important in the Franciscan Pontificate, as should the recovery of our shared heritage, the Church has two lungs not one.

15 comments:

epsilon said...

What about Francis' connection with the Orthodox, who by the way has survived since his youth with only one lung evidently!

lx54 said...

I am very encouraged by these first signs, even if I do to some extent share your worries about whether the Liturgy will be at the top of Pope Francis' agenda.

Have you seen any of the news beginning to dribble out in the Italian press that Francis bumped into Cardinal Laws in St Maria Maggiore, and told him to pack his bags as he was being sent to a monastery? If this is an accurate portrayal of what took place, it is a very hopeful sign of things to come.

Robert said...

The Beauty of the East and West
http://byztex.blogspot.com/2008/06/ecumenical-patriarch-and-pope-of-rome.html

Memories:)

Robert said...

Biden, Pelosi to Represent America at Pope's Inaugural Mass

http://www.weeklystandard.com/blogs/biden-pelosi-represent-america-popes-inaugural-mass_707643.html?utm_source=twitterfeed&utm_medium=twitter

And the Patriarch of Constantinople (New Rome) will be there to watch. Just to make sure the Pope doesn’t give communion to pro-abortionists
.
http://marymagdalen.blogspot.com/2013/03/bartholomew-is-coming-to-inauguration.html

Should be interesting to watch!.

parepidemos said...

Truly excellent news. I anticipate a significant gesture will be forthcoming on the part of Pope Francis.

viterbo said...

This is hopeful. The Orthodox have never fallen into the trap of supposing that there needs to be a choice -...giving fitting glory to God...or earthly concerns...giving fitting glory to God...or earthly concerns...giving fitting glory to God...or earthly concerns...of course, earthly concerns.

there's a story that St Teresa of Avila once said to a sister, 'dinner will be at six-thirty, if there's anything to eat'. the faith of those unrealistic mystics.

JARay said...

So, Biden and Pelosi are to represent Obama at the inauguration Mass. He could hardly have chosen better representatives if he tried. Two Catholic failures representing one of the worst Presidents that America has ever had.

JFelix said...

Fr. Blake, bless!

While His Holiness +Bartholomew's impending appearance at our Holy Father +Francis' inaguration Mass is certainly very significant, the phrase "the first time this has happened since the Great Schism" seems (to me) to imply that such events were not uncommon in the past during the time of the Church Undivided. It doesn't seem to be the case, and probably nonexistent at all.

Traditionally when the head of a local Church of patriarchal rank - Rome, Alexandria, Antioch, Constantinople, Jerusalem, as well as the Catholicosates of Selucia-Ctesiphon (Persia), Echmiadzin (Armenia), and Mtskheta (Georgia) - gets canonically elected, consecrated Bishop (early on), and enthroned, he sends out to all the metropolitans and bishops of his patriarchal territory, as well as to the other patriarchal-rank Sees a "Synodical Letter", which informs them of his canonical election, episcopal consecration and enthronement, contains his profession of faith, and a request for ecclesiastical communion. Usually,the other patriarchs will then send him letters of reply, either communing with him, or in the case of heresiarchs, cutting off communion. Such synodical letters, and corresponding letters of reply, are often smack at the middle of the Christological controversies (like the Monothelite controversy). This beautiful tradition of exchange of letters was revived by Blessed John Paul II in the CCEO as the requirement for newly-elected heads of the Oriental Catholic Churches of patriarchal rank, setting aside the prior requirement that newly-elected Patriarchs must petition Rome for the pallium like any other Western metropolitan.

But then again all this may make the event more significant than it first appears; this may be the first time an occupant of the See of Constantinople will be present for the enthronement of him who was called to the See of Rome, ever! :-)

Genty said...

I do hope a place is reserved for Mgr. Keith Newton.

Anagnostis said...

"the first time this has happened since the Great Schism"

Did it ever happen before it? I'd be very surprised.

Anagnostis said...

viterbo - you're right. This false opposition between giving glory to God and service to man is literally diabolical. I understand very well why so many Trads reacted with fear and consternation to the election of somebody they perceived to be a proponent of it. They should, however, have kept their powder dry at the very least. They're not exactly guiltless themselves.

It's bizarrre how much time this Orthodox spends defending the Pope from Catholic antagonists of the right and the left.

William Tighe said...

IIRC, a Pope of Rome who visited Constantinople in the 530s (there were at least a couple of such) actually consecrated a newly-chosen Patriarch of Constantinople. I think it may have been Pope Agapetus I.

Greg Collins said...

We live in remarkable times. May God bless both Pope Francis and Patriarch Bartholomew and may they both truly be bridge builders.

Robert said...

Been really thinking. Both the Patriarch of Constantinople Bartholomew as well as Patriarch Kirill of Moscow really like the choice of Pope Francis. Maybe we should follow the guidance of the Eastern Patriarchs, before we rush to judge.

johnf said...

When at University I used to attend an annual Mass in the Uniate Rite, sung in ancient Slavonic at St Patrick's Soho Square. I was intrigued to note that in the Canon of the Mass, prayers were asked not only for the Pope but also the Patriarch of Constantinople.

The raprochment between the Roman and Greek Churches took place some time ago, with the excommunications lifted.

So isn't it about time that we had prayers both for the Pope and the Patriarch in every Mass?