Tuesday, November 11, 2008

In Tempore Belli



















6 comments:

umblepie said...

"Out of the depths have I cried unto thee O Lord, Lord hear my voice and let thine ear be attentive to the voice of my supplication ......"

matthew archbold said...

amazing and beautiful photos. thanks.

Henry said...

Robert Graves had something to say about this in "Goodbye to All That". Many soldiers falsely claimed to be Catholics because it was the Catholic priests who would come to the front to administer the sacraments. Which could have some bearing on the way the Catholic Church flourished during 1920s and 1930s.

gemoftheocean said...

Thanks for posting these. I particularly like the one of the priest saying Mass on the hood of a jeep while wearing combat boots. As profound an event as the pope saying high Mass in St. PEter's on Easter. When you get right down to it, the same thing happens.

When I was a girl, living in Virginia in the mid 60s our pastor was made an auxiliary bishop. He'd been with the troops in the Normandy landings. A real man's man. Fr. Flaherty, now deceased.

I always liked the scene in the movie "The Longest Day" when there was an English priest [not sure whether Anglican or Catholic] who'd dropped his "Mass kit" in swampy water and dove for it. Based on true incident.

I gather that many non-Catholics were especially impressed by the valor of Catholic chaplains, due to their willingness to go out while under fire to give last rites.

Also there is the inspiring story of the 4 chaplains during WWII on the USS Dorchester who gave up their own life preservers so that other might live, among many other gallant actions A rabbi, two protestant ministers and a Catholic priest. They were: Rabbi Alexander Goode
Rev. George L. Fox
Rev. Clark V. Poling
Father John P. Washington

And their story can be seen here.

Anna B. said...

beautiful photos...

A Seminarian said...

A tear formed in my eye.